Thursday, October 14, 2010

The Value Of Time

I use the scheduling application which syncs with my existing calendars for easy scheduling and efficiency.  The folks at are trying to understand the needs of the calendar of the future.  As part of this they took a look at illustrating what the value of time is:

The Calendar of the Future got us thinking about the value of time. Every day, hour and minute is more than a spot to fill on your calendar. It's more than a meeting, reminder or tick of the clock. It's our lives.
Time is not a renewable resource, and it waits for no one.
The team at thinks sometimes a little perspective is all we need.

I think has a great point:

Time waits for no-one so what are you waiting for?
Stop wasting time on things you can't control and focus on things you can.

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  1. Tim,

    You sounded good on the radio yesterday!

    You and Tungle raise a great point. While many leaders will do well by striving to expand their circle of influence, there are certainly things we cannot control. Spending time and energy on those matters are counterproductive. This principle is also great for stress management. Don't spend time on or get stressed out over things you can't control.


  2. Recognizing the value of time is the essence of lean thinking. It is the main difference of mass production methodologies that are focused on quantity and scale without considering the element of time. (eg. EOQ) Unfortunately traditional accounting does not deal with the value of min and hour. You cannot really calculate ROI for tiny time buckets and that makes adoption of lean so counter-intuitive.

  3. James, I couldn't agree more. If you are just looking for numbers or even at numbers without consider the process by which they occur you can miss the forest through the trees. Like teaching people to understand the value for the customer we must teach the value of time. Not all time is the same. We must continuously learn and improve.